Tag Archives: elizabeth bishop

JANUARY 4 –Bird and Bindi

I can’t even begin, right now, to sort out all of the almost supernatural occurrences of the past weeks, write them down, pass them on. I know I am meant to sort all of it out, in words that make sense, to ultimately help other people. And I will do that. But right now I’m super tired.

Still, to remind those who care: there is work to be done. As everyone has been informing me, France is now one more “opt-out” country—-meaning you’re an organ donor unless you opt out. We are going to work on fixing as much of the broken transplant system in our own country as we can. I’m grateful to everyone who has volunteered to be part of the army, and we will be in touch.

For now though, Nick and I are going to California. My wonderful brother will be warming the hearth fires here, minding our house, so we don’t have to worry about leaving it untended. Caitlin’s tree will be up through Twelfth Night and beyond.

California is a place Caitlin and I had planned to visit ‘after transplant.’ (How easily that phrase had become part of our everyday conversation; seems sad and naive now, but I’m grateful for our optimism. It kept us going.)

Oddly, neither she nor I have/had ever been to California, so we will take her with us in the only way we can: spiritually. We will drive up the Pacific Coast Highway, stay in Big Sur, and eventually visit Jess in San Francisco. We will see redwoods, and honor the one so foolishly cut down by the arrogant and sorry young souls who make up the current administration of Boston Children’s Hospital.

A few years back, in her beloved Paris, Caitlin bought herself a tiny, bird-shaped ring. It became one of her most treasured possessions. I just couldn’t bear to put it into the

<< coffin, horrid word>>

Instead, I’ve tied it to a necklace of mine. I added a red bindi from the little sticky-pack Jess brought back from India. I put the bindi in between the bird’s wings. I will wear it on our trip and Caitlin will be with us up at Big Sur and in San Francisco with Jess, and with us among the redwoods that stupid humans haven’t yet destroyed.

bird and bindi.JPG

Bird and bindi

My niece Emily wrote this to my sister the other day:

Know what’s so strange? A few days after Caitlin passed I heard this poem called ‘the art of losing’ on an NPR podcast and it felt really significant to me so I looked it up and saved it and now I’m sitting here reading the writings in Caitlin’s pamphlet from her service and that poem is in there

Later, my sister wrote:

Today is my first day back at working out. I always put in a podcast to keep me on the treadmill and it turns out the first one in my queue was the one that ends in that poem. ❤

These are the coincidences that are not coincidences.

The only omission in the service program was the title and author of the quite-famous  poem–which is actually a form of poem called a villanelle, a form that itself, is very hard to master….

ONE ART

by Elizabeth Bishop

The art of losing isn’t hard to master;
so many things seem filled with the intent
to be lost that their loss is no disaster.
Lose something every day. Accept the fluster
of lost door keys, the hour badly spent.
The art of losing isn’t hard to master.
Then practice losing farther, losing faster:
places, and names, and where it was you meant
to travel. None of these will bring disaster.
I lost my mother’s watch. And look! my last, or
next-to-last, of three loved houses went.
The art of losing isn’t hard to master.
I lost two cities, lovely ones. And, vaster,
some realms I owned, two rivers, a continent.
I miss them, but it wasn’t a disaster.
—Even losing you (the joking voice, a gesture
I love) I shan’t have lied. It’s evident
the art of losing’s not too hard to master
though it may look like (Write it!) like disaster.

–Maryanne